Tag Archives: Tsjuder

Urgehal – Aeons in Sodom

Urgehal - Aeons in Sodom

Urgehal [Norway]
Aeons in Sodom
2016
Full Length
Season of Mist
Black Metal

After the unfortunate demise of Trondr Nefas, I thought that Endezzma‘s Erotik Nekrosis would be the last that I hear of his works. But Urgehal and Season of Mist this year surprised me with a brand new Urgehal record. Despite having lost much touch with the extreme metal genres, I decided to just have a listen to Aeons in Sodom without putting much thought into the background of the album.

Continue reading

TSJUDER Renews Deal With SEASON OF MIST

Season of Mist are proud to announce the blood inking of a new deal with TSJUDER! The Norwegian black metal cult act has already entered studio to record a new album to be released later this year.

TSJUDER comment: “We are proud to be re-signed to Season of Mist. For us there’s never been any doubt about continuing the cooperation with our label. We have a very good relationship, and they have always done an excellent job for us. We have just started the recording of our next album, so prepare for Hell!”

The band adds: “We are currently in studio recording our new album, and we are about half done. We have spent some 3-4 years creating this material, and as always we have not been rushing it. The music is in the same vein as always; raw and brutal black metal without any compromises. We plan to be done in March, but the release will come later this year. On our upcoming concerts we will probably play a few of the new songs. We will make it worth the wait!”

Tsjuder 2015

Album Review: Cainan Dawn – Thavmial

Cainan Dawn - Thavmial

Cainan Dawn [France]
Thavmial
2014
Full Length
Osmose Productions
Black Metal

In just the past 3 months, we have already heard impressive releases from bands numerous pioneers of black metal, from the Psywar single of Mayhem to another new full length from Finnish black metal tyrants Sargeist. Osmose Productions decides to chime in as well with the release of French occult black metal band Cainan Dawn‘s sophomore full length album, Thavmial. With the number of remarkable black metal albums this early in the year, Cainan Dawn certainly has huge shoes to fill.

The occult themes are immediately obvious from opening track Keter, an ambient track that places the listener in the midst of a ritual and leaves one quickly feeling uneasy, with a dark omen of impending doom. Things get more exciting rather quickly as soon as The Brood hits the listener, and one is quickly reminded of the style of pioneers of black metal such as Mayhem, not only with the riffing of Avgruun, but also in the cold atmosphere that the band manages to evoke. Along with the gargled, undecipherable vocals of Heruforod, one could have easily mistaken him for speaking in tongues, a nice touch to the theme of occultism and mysticism of Cainan Dawn.

For all it’s atmosphere and ambient, Cainan Dawn still manages to retain an energetic touch to their brand of black metal, and this often through the hyperactive work of drummer Hljodr, often giving the band a nice sound that is reminiscent of TsjuderUrgehal or Gorgoroth. The epic, war-like tone of his drums even brings in some slight Bathory influence, helping to add a rather belligerent touch to the album. The slower moments on the album, like the transition between World Among Worlds and Kaon also bring about some nice Inquisition-like sounds, further enhancing that ritualistic aspect of the album.

The thing about Cainan Dawn is that despite their French origin, there is very little French influence that were spotted on Thavmial, be it in the dissonance of Deathspell Omega or in the shoegaze of Alcest, et al., utilising them sparingly, resulting in an album that is extremely effective and memorable without being overly weird or jarring.

So while waiting for the new Mayhem to drop later this yearCainan Dawn‘s Thavmial is probably the best black metal album of the year thus far.

[xrr rating=4.5/5]

Cainan Dawn on the internet:
Facebook
Osmose Productions

Album Review: Tsjuder – Desert Northern Hell

Libretto SOM 092.indd

Tsjuder [Norway]
Desert Northern Hell
2004/2013 (Reissue)
Full Length
Season of Mist
Black Metal

Norwegian black metal band Tsjuder made a surprise comeback in 2009, and soon released their reunion album Legion Helvete in 2011. Desert Northern Hell was the band’s final release before going on hiatus in 2006, and along with Tsjuder-related project Krypt‘s Preludes to Death, this was easily one of my personal favourite black metal records of all time amongst the numerous releases that the band put out since their formation in the early 90s.

Desert Northern Hell easily encapsulates what true Norwegian black metal should sound like, and right from the start of the album with Malignant Coronation, the band unleashes their uncompromising, relentless brand of music onto the listener. The pace is urgent, the riffs are furious and aggressive as fuck, and one can easily spot classic Norwegian black metal influences over here, reminding one of early material of bands like Mayhem and Gorgoroth. Drummer AntiChristian sets the pace for the record, and for the most part the band goes at breakneck speed, complemented by the equally speedy riff-work of guitarist Draugluin, bringing to mind their compatriots Ragnarok‘s later works. While the lead guitars, like Mayhem, are there to reinforce that cold atmosphere, the numerous guitar solos that could be spotted also display Draugluin’s abilities on his fretboard, not only with the shredding but also with the usage of the whammy bar on songs like Ghoul.

Throughout the album, the band ensures that things do not get stale, as each of the tracks on the album have their own unique sound and characteristic, ensuring that the entire listening experience of Desert Northern Hell remains fresh every time the listener revisits the album. Not everything is just sheer speed though as there are moments where the band take slight slowdowns, and such moments like the intro of Mouth of Madness even bring in some slight resemblance to Marduk‘s slower, but heavier material. Unholy Paragon even sees the band making use of clean instrumentation to reinforce the cold, haunting atmosphere before letting all hell break loose. The epic, 11-minute closer Morbid Lust best displays Tsjuder‘s songwriting abilities, going through an entire spectrum of negativity and musical styles, and till today it leaves me wondering how it is possible for me to sit through the entirety of the track without feeling even a tinge of urge to skip the track.

One thing that certainly helped in the overall experience of Desert Northern Hell is also the production of the album, ensuring that the music sounds huge as fuck, and the listener easily feels as though he is buried under an entire wall of sound.

As if the original material on Desert Northern Hell weren’t good enough to completely captivate the listener, the 2013 reissue by Season of Mist includes four bonus live tracks from a 2001 recording, displaying the band’s live blasphemous onslaught. While not exactly some of the best live black metal recordings, it easily encapsulates the mood and raw energy of the band’s performance, retaining the sense of authenticity in the recording, and even on the live tracks, the band has certainly stuck true to their motto of “no compromise”.

Oh, and not forgetting that excellent cover of Bathory‘s Sacrifice. Instant classic.

More related articles about Tsjuder here.

Tsjuder on the internet:
Official website
Facebook
MySpace
Season of Mist

Interview with Tsjuder

Tsjuder surprised fans of the band with their announcement of the return from Hiatus in 2010. With the band going on hiatus after the release of the brilliant 2004 album Desert Northern Hell, and the high quality releases of the respective bands of Nag and Draugluin, Krypt and Tyrann, Tsjuder’s latest offering, Legion Helvete was certainly an album that longtime fans looked forward to. We catch up with Nag to find out the circumstances of the reunion and more.


HMT: Greetings Nag! Thank you for taking the time for this interview, how are things going for the band so far?

Nag: things are going fine.

After the release of 2004’s Desert Northern Hell, the band was put on hiatus, with yourself focusing on Krypt and Draugluin and AntiChristian on Tyrann. What was it that made the band decide to play together again in 2010?

Nag: I think we all were longing to play in Tsjuder. Tsjuder has been a great part of our lifes, so something was missing. Also I think we all knew that there was a great possibility that we would get back together.

Also, what was it that made the band decide to go on hiatus in 2004, and was the reactivation of the band in 2010 expected?

Nag: Tsjuder goes way back to 1993. After so many years of playing together, a couple of years with the band on ice are not exactly astonishing. There was no particular cause for the split. We just needed a break. In the meantime we all played in other bands, but in 2009 we decided to reignite Tsjuder.

With the reactivation of the band in 2010, the band has released the first full length in 7 years in the form of last year’s Legion Helvete. How has response been for the album so far, and is the band satisfied with the results?

Nag: The general response has been good. Of course there are people who don’t like it compared to the older stuff, and there are those who think it’s the best Black Metal album ever. Yes, all of us are pretty satisfied with it. We learned a lot during the recording process of it, so for the next album I think we’ll be more prepared, and the result will be even better.

This album, being the first new material that the band has put out in 7 years and after the reactivation of the band, what was the songwriting process like, and is it any different from how the band functioned before the hiatus?

Nag: Well, first of all I think the process of creating Legion Helvete was very good. We went more back to the way we made the music on the earlier recordings; Draugluin and myself sitting together and arranging everything. Desert Northern Hell was created a little different since I was living in Australia while much of the music was created.

Legion Helvete sees the music of Tsjuder continue in the direction that previous albums has set out with, but with a markedly rawer production quality compared to, say, Desert Northern Hell. Was this an intentional move on the part of the band, and if so, why?

Nag: We have never compared our sound to any of our previous recordings, and trying to improve or copy it. We have a few reference albums we like to use, and we start from scratch. I don’t agree that the production is rawer. I think it’s about the same, but still the overall sound is quite different.

The songtitles and lyrics on Legion Helvete are also sung in the band’s native Norwegian language. Were there any particular reasons behind this?

Nag: Actually when it comes to the lyrics on Legion Helvete, they were all written by myself and Draugluin between 93-95. By coincidence I found and old folder with Tsjuder stuff some time before we reunited, and it contained 12-13 lyrics, and some songs which were never recorded. We decided to use those lyrics because we have a strong feeling for the early 90s, and the lyrics are pure and back to the roots when we started the band. At first we decided to use some of them, but we quickly decided to only use lyrics from that folder on the album.

Compared to past albums as well, the album artwork of Legion Helvete is stylistically different. Are there any underlying concepts that lie beneath the album artwork, and how did the album artwork come about?

Nag: Our initial though was just to use a photo, like we’ve done on Demonic Possession and Desert Northern Hell, but somewhere along the line we changed our minds. “Legion Helvete” was actually the title of a T-shirt we designed a long time ago, but which was never printed. Draugluin and I have talked about this title from time to time, and we decided to use it now. The demon/devil is designed with inputs from Tsjuder. It’s somewhat a demonic version of the Norwegian Crown Symbol.

The limited edition digipak version also comes with a metal medallion with it. What is the significance behind this, and what made the band decide to include this memorabilia along with the album?

Nag: Yes, we did this because we thought it would be a special thing. The idea/inspiration for doing this was from Marduk – Panzer Division Marduk.

2012 will be a busy year for the band, with Tsjuder playing in festivals like the Maryland Deathfest, Inferno Metal Festival and King of Black Metal Festival. How are preparations going so far for the band?

Nag: Well, we’ve put together a set of approx 1 hour 10 mins, and we rehearse it 1-2 times a week. Unfortunately we can’t play that long on most of the concerts, but we will on some of the smaller gigs we’re going to do.

Nag, with Tsjuder now being active again, what are the plans ahead for Krypt? Will fans of the band get to hear any new material anytime soon?

Nag: After Tsjuder reformed, we haven’t worked much with Krypt, or at least I haven’t. Desecrator has made much new music, and the next album is already planned. Because of Tsjuder the music will primarily be made by Desecrator, together with Paal. The line-up will consist of Desecrator, Paal and myself. I’m not sure who will play what yet, but I think Desecrator and Paal will do all the guitar, and maybe bass, Desecrator on drums and myself on vocals.

Related articles:
Album Review: Tsjuder – Legion Helvete
Interview with Krypt

Tsjuder on the internet:
Official website
Facebook
MySpace
ReverbNation
Season of Mist

©2012 Heavy Metal Tribune | Clarence

Album Review: Tsjuder – Legion Helvete

Tsjuder [Norway]
Legion Helvete
2011
Full Length
Season of Mist
Black Metal

The announcement of Tsjuder‘s return certainly excited me, with the band going hiatus on a high note after their 2004 release Desert Northern Hell, which displayed a marked improvement from their previous releases, and through the releases of brilliant post-hiatus albums by the respective bands of Nag and Draugluin, Krypt and Tyrann. Krypt‘s Preludes to Death also easily came out on top of my favourite 2010 albums, so Tsjuder‘s new album, Legion Helvete certainly left me with pretty high expectations, to say the least.

Unfortunately, the first listen to Legion Helvete turned out to be pretty disappointing, with the album almost sounding like a half-hearted effort by the band. The weak production quality (at least when listened through headphones), compared to the powerful sound that Desert Northern Hell or even Preludes to Death had, did not help this in the least, and only serves to further drag down the quality of the album. Fortunately though, numerous listens later the album becomes more enjoyable. As per previous albums, the band does not give any chance for the listener to prepare for what’s coming, as The Daemon Throne kicks off the onslaught with a bombastic wall of sound without any warning at all. Nag’s characteristic vocals are still present, and are still as tortured as fuck, and Draugluin and AntiChristian also remain as polished on their individual instruments as ever, displaying how they have not let their muscles taken a break since the last time they released material together. Even Nag’s bass is also clearly audible, on tracks like Fra en Råtten Kiste.

The songwriting style, for the most part, sticks to the same formula as what the band has utilised on Desert Northern Hell, with certain songs like Fra en Råtten Kiste sounding as if it would fit perfectly on the aforementioned album. The 10-minute closing track Vårt Helvete also sounds like a weak attempt to recreate the masterpiece that was Morbid Lust, and though it does have a few enjoyable moments of its own, the track gets boring quickly. While this does not necessarily mean a bad thing, it’s definitely not what a fan would expect after a 7-year long wait.

Some songs also end weakly, such as the transition between Fra en Råtten Kiste and Dauðir, which leave listeners slightly disoriented and fans of Tsjuder‘s previous works disappointed. Dauðir even has moments of lead guitar fiddling in the background at some parts, and these certainly seem slightly pointless and could have easily been done away with. Furthermore, the songs are considerably less powerful compared to those written on Desert Northern Hell, without powerful moments such as those on Possessed, or even their cover of Bathory‘s Sacrifice, leaving little memorable moments on what could have been a potentially excellent album.

Overall though, while Legion Helvete certainly does not do justice to the legacy that Tsjuder has left for themselves before their hiatus in 2006, as a standalone album, it could be a good example of what Norwegian black metal should sound like.

Tsjuder on the internet:
Official website
Facebook
MySpace
ReverbNation
Season of Mist

©2012 Heavy Metal Tribune | Hong Rui