Tag Archives: Antediluvian

Triumvir Foul – Triumvir Foul

Triumvir Foul - Triumvir Foul

Triumvir Foul [USA]
Triumvir Foul
2016
Full Length
Blood Harvest
Black/Death Metal

Triumvir Foul‘s debut offering last year in the form of their demo An Oath of Blood and Fire couldn’t come at a worse time, with my interest in the black/death metal genre, in particularly the barbaric, filthy style declining rapidly. For some reason though, their self-titled full length this year held certain promise, and listening to the 42 minute onslaught on Triumvir Foul, it would have been a mistake to give this release a miss as well.

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Valdur – Pathetic Scum

Valdur - Pathetic Scum

Valdur [USA]
Pathetic Scum
2015
Full Length
Bloody Mountain Records
Black/Death Metal

With all my attention focused on the stoner, doom and psychedelic genres, I have overlooked the filthy, bestial black and death metal that I used to love so much, with the new Archgoat being the only record to really catch my attention so far. That was until I caught wind of American black/death metal horde Valdur releasing their fourth full length album Pathetic Scum, two years after the triumphant release that was At War With.

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Behold! The Monolith – Architects of the Void

Behold! The Monolith - Architects of the Void

Behold! The Monolith [USA]
Architects of the Void
2015
Full Length
Independent
Stoner/Doom Metal

Architects of the Void may be American stoner/doom metal outfit Behold! The Monolith‘s third full length release to date, yet it is only on this album that I finally encounter the band. Initially expecting a thrash record with the band’s futuristic, thrash-inspired logo (think Havok, Bonded by Blood et. al), Behold! The Monolith instead presents a crushing and heavy tone on Architects of the Void, and the band couldn’t be further from the first impression one may get from the visual aesthetics.

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Album Review: Witchrist – Vritra

Witchrist - Vritra

Witchrist [New Zealand]
Vritra
2014
EP
Iron Bonehead Productions
Black/Death Metal

Towards the end of 2014, New Zealand death horde Witchrist announced the end of the band, along with two final releases; one of which being the EP Vritra. Along with the final two releases, Witchrist ropes in KzR of Bölzer to handle vocals of the band’s swan song.

[xrr rating=5/5]

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Album Review: Dire Omen – Wresting the Revelation of Futility

Dire Omen - Wresting the Revelation of Futility

Dire Omen [Canada]
Wresting the Revelation of Futility
2014
Full Length
Dark Descent Records
Black/Death Metal

It has been quite a long while since the last bestial black/death metal release that I really enjoyed, and it is quite fitting that the first one to once again hook me back into this filthy abyss is a Canadian band and their Dark Descent Records debut. Since 2008, Dire Omen has been honing their craft, and almost 6 years on, the band finally releases their first ever full length album, Wresting the Revelation of Futility.

The first thing that caught my attention on Wresting the Revelation of Futility were the drums of Kevin on Here and Hereafter (Overture), reminding me of the entire reason behind my initial love with the genre: the primitive yet relentless and aggressive style that bands like Dire Omen tend to portray. And along with the chaotic riffs of Rolando, one quickly starts to draw comparisons with bands such as AntediluvianMitochondrion or Heresiarch. The playing style of Rolando, alternating between crushing chugs and trem-picking add to the delight of fans of Grave Miasma or Incantation, leaving one constantly at the edge. On moments where the band decides to take things down a notch in terms of speed and heaviness, they replace it with haunting atmospherics, most obvious on songs like Hemotically Possessed.

The production of Wresting the Revelation of Futility is raw and filthy as fuck, and that resulting cavernous sound of the record reminds one of those atmospheric releases of bands like Pseudogod or even Grave Miasma, with the playing style of Dire Omen. Furthermore, the nice thing is that the bass of Connor is mixed rather high on the record, and his booming bass certainly adds to the already ominous ambient, leaving one feel even more at unease.

Dire Omen‘s Wresting the Revelation of Futility is everything that a record from a genre as such should be – filthy, brutal and unapologetically bestial.

[xrr rating=5/5]

Dire Omen on the internet:
Facebook
BandCamp
Dark Descent Records

Album Review: Antediluvian – Through the Cervix of Hawaah

Antediluvian [Canada]
Through the Cervix of Hawaah
2011
Full Length
Profound Lore Records
Black/Death Metal

Finally, after 5 years of releasing nothing but EPs and demos, Canada’s Antediluvian releases their debut full length album, Through the Cervix of Hawaah. Last year’s compilation album, Watcher’s Reign managed to capture my attention with their extremely raw take on black/death metal, leaving me craving for more and anticipating for new material from the band. The release of Through the Cervix of Hawaah then finally feeds my craving from this destructive Canadian band.

Opening track Rephiam Sceptre… sounds almost as if the band has decided to take a different approach to their songwriting, with a lead guitar line that reminds listeners more of Norwegian-styled black metal rather than the Canadian style of bestial black/death metal that the band has been known for thus far, with the track ending with an almost epic guitar line, sounding like what bands like Watain would write instead of a band like Antediluvian. Fortunately though, as …Through the Cervix of Hawaah begins, this is brutal and extremely bestial black/death metal as we know the band. The change (and personally, the improvement) of the production quality is immediately noticeable and will also make the album more enjoyable throughout, compared to the demo-quality production that previous Antediluvian releases have.

As the album progresses, the similarity to bands such as Portal becomes more and more obvious, with the album sounding like a Portal album with a more bass-heavy production. The heavy and dark atmosphere is also reminiscent of bands such as Vasaeleth and Grave Miasma. The buzzing guitar tone is abrasive, and the vocals of Haasiophis and Nabucodnosor are tortured, and sees them alternating between low, gurgled growls and higher pitched shrieks, increasing the level of insanity in the music. Like on Watcher’s Reign as well, the drumming is also one of the charming aspects of the album, with Mars’ drumming being one of the things that initially captivated me.

The band on Through the Cervix of Hawaah also experiments with new songwriting styles, with songs like Intuitus Mortuus providing some of the slowest moments of Antediluvian, focussing instead of the dark and haunting atmosphere on the track, on top of the usual faster numbers that are familiar to listeners, providing some variation in the band’s music compared to their Canadian counterparts. Things like the inhuman scream on Erect Reflection (Abyss of Organic Matter) causes the listeners skin to crawl as well. The higher level of technicality in the band’s music also sets them apart from other similar acts, with songs like Scions of Ha Nachash providing listeners with riffing patterns that are not typical in other similarly raw and primitive acts, though it does take some effort in order to hear these elements beneath the chaos that runs above.

The tightness of the band is obvious on Through the Cervix of Hawaah, and the album also displays a marked growth in the band’s abilities in songwriting and as musicians, making this album being one that contains some of the best material that Antediluvian has released so far.

Related articles:
Album Review: Antediluvian – Watcher’s Reign

Antediluvian on the internet:
Bandcamp
Profound Lore Records

©2012 Heavy Metal Tribune | Hong Rui

Album Review: Antediluvian – Watcher’s Reign

Antediluvian [Canada]
Watcher’s Reign
2010
Compilation
Invictus Productions
Black Metal
8.5/10

While Scandinavian countries were busy coming up with cold and bleak black metal throughout the 80s and 90s, something else was brewing in the Canadian underground, a more violent and abrasive form of black metal with pioneers Blasphemy. Thereafter, bands such as Revenge and Conqueror have continued spreading the plague through ear-raping war metal. Antediluvian joins the ranks of such bands, with Watcher’s Reign being a compilation of materials between 2006 and 2007.

Watcher’s Reign begin with the very first recordings of Antediluvian, with the first 5 tracks taken from the Primeval Cyclical Catastrophism demo in 2006. Serpent of Thy Grail begins with a disturbing background noise before the duo behind the band begins with the onslaught, an extremely muffled guitar riff laying down the foundations that the chaos that is to come is built on. The buzzing guitar tone that is so characteristic bands playing the Canadian style of black metal such as Black Witchery is unmistakable, instantaneously leading the listener to identify and categorise the band.

Besides the speed that the band travels at, Mars-Sekhmet also pounds on the drums relentlessly, almost as if he had a vengeance against the drum set, unleashing whatever fury he has on it. The monstrous gargling growls and seemingly directionless guitar lines of Haasiophis complement the punishing drums, satisfying any listener that is in need of a bout of violence. Guitar leads are few, and when there are any at all they are equally (if not more) chaotic then the rest of the instruments (think Revenge), such as on The Pit of Bones. The vocals are also inconsistently mixed, alternating between loudness and softness, further adding to the chaos. The songs also end as suddenly as they begain, such as the opening track Serpent of Thy Grail, leaving a path of destruction behind it and a listener still scratching his head, wondering what just happened.

Songs such as Desert Succubus, and the moment during the transition to The Pit of Bones provide listeners with a short break in the middle, allowing listeners just enough time to catch a single breath before beginning their aural assault once more. Yet these moments are rare, and even then the atmosphere is so heavy that it almost feels as if something were pressing on one’s chest, making an action as natural as breathing suddenly seem so unnatural.

As the record progresses and the later demos are presented, one can easily track and notice the progress of Antediluvian. On tracks 6-7, taken from the split with Nuclearhammer, the improved production quality is easily observed, along with Haasiophis’ shift in vocal styles, less of a growl yet more vile and violent than before, and an echoey effect was also utilised. There is also a slight change in the songwriting, as evident from the slowdown in the overall tempo and speed of the music, though the heaviness and the darkness of the atmosphere is retained. The improvement in production quality is nothing to complain about though as it remains sufficiently raw for the style of music, though the primitive production on the first 5 tracks certainly caught my attention more with the raw energy exploding from the band.

The last 3 tracks sees the band going back to yet another demo, Prehistorik Khaos and all that has to be said about these tracks are self-explanatory by the title of the release. Haasiophis goes back to a low growl once more, and the familiar heavy hitting on the drums once more greet the listener. The guitar gets more air time this time though, with schizo-sounding leads littered throughout the tracks, ensuring that the listeners stay insane until the end of the songs.

This is war metal as dirty as it can get, and sufficiently allows fans of such genre to track the progress of the band, quenching their thirst for blasphemous rage and violence.

Antediluvian on the internet:
Invictus Productions

©2011 Heavy Metal Tribune | Hong Rui